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Artistic representation of inside of cell with different organelles

Cells build local supply chain of metabolites required for gene expression regulation

31 August 2022

Research from the Patil group published in Science Advances reveals that parts of the TCA cycle, originally thought to only happen in the mitochondria, are happening in the nucleus, closer to the DNA and ready to be dispatched when critical processes of the cell increase their demand, without barriers.

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New paper published in Nature: Bioaccumulation of therapeutic drugs by human gut bacteria

15 September 2021

Common medications can accumulate in gut bacteria, altering bacterial function and potentially reducing the medications’ effectiveness. This study started as a collaborative project at EMBL Heidelberg and was concluded in the group of Kiran Patil after his move to the MRC Toxiciology Unit in Cambridge. Read the full...

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New paper published in Nature Communications today: The pathogenesis of mesothelioma is driven by a dysregulated translatome

13 August 2021

Mesothelioma cancer patients may benefit from new research that sheds light onto the reason behind the growth of these tumour cells which, unlike most cancers, have no oncogenic drivers. Scientists from the MRC Toxicology Unit (University of Cambridge) and the CRUK Beatson Institute (University of Glasgow) worked on the...

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Nature Communications featured article: Treatment of COVID-19 with remdesivir in the absence of humoral immunity: a case report

1 March 2021

A recently publised article from Dr. James Thaventhiran's group about the potential treatment effect of remedesvir in COVID-19 patients was chosen as a featured paper by Nature Communiactions. The scientific achivement is highlighted under the topic of "Microbiology and Infectious diseases" in the journal's January issue .

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Cryo-EM structural analysis reveals Caspase-8 catalytic domain architecture for co-ordinated control of cell fate

17 February 2021

Marion MacFarlane, MRC Investigator and Deputy Director at the MRC Toxicology Unit is the senior author of a new study published in Nature Communications which reveals how ‘Cryo-EM structural analysis of FADD:Caspase-8 complexes defines the catalytic dimer architecture for co-ordinated control of cell fate’. “The core FADD...

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Cooperation is key to success in microbial communities

12 January 2021

Dr Kiran Patil, Director of Research at the MRC Toxicology Unit is the senior author of a new study which shows how cooperation among bacterial species allows them to thrive as a community. This research is from the MRC Toxicology Unit at the University of Cambridge and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL). "If...

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Remdesivir likely to be highly effective antiviral against SARS-CoV-2

14 December 2020

The drug remdesivir is likely to be a highly effective antiviral against SARS-CoV-2, according to a new study by a team of UK scientists. Writing in Nature Communications, the researchers describe giving the drug to a patient with COVID-19 and a rare immune disorder, and observing a dramatic improvement in his symptoms and...

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Researchers test a drug that may allow more cancer patients to benefit from immunotherapy in the future

3 November 2020

Immunotherapy can be a lifesaver for cancer patients, but some patients' tumours don't respond well to this treatment. However, researchers are encouraged by a recent clinical trial that suggests that it may be possible to expand immunotherapy to help more people in the future. Immunotherapy works by marshalling the body's...

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Air pollution from brake dust may have same harmful effects on immune cells as diesel exhaust

20 January 2020

Metal particles from the abrasion of brake pads - up to a fifth of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) air pollution at roadsides - may cause inflammation and reduce the ability of immune cells to kill bacteria, a new study has found, similarly to particles derived from diesel exhaust. The scientists, primarily funded by the...

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New exciting paper from the Willis Lab

18 December 2019

We are pleased to announce a new paper from the Willis lab, which made front cover of science signaling, shows the common chemotherapy doxorubicin can promote the migration of cancer cells through phosphorylation of a translation factor. Please see the links to the article published in Science Signaling below: Summary...

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