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MRC Toxicology Unit

 

Current studentships:

PhD Studentship - Predicting microbiome-drug interactions using metabolic modelling and machine learning

Drugs and other xenobiotics often pass through the digestive tract. Yet, how these compounds influence the gut microbiome and in turn get modified into potentially toxic products is known only in a few cases. Recent findings in this area have clearly brought forward the fundamental role of the microbiome in determining drug efficacy, mode of action and side effects. The goal of this PhD project will be to use machine-learning and first principle modelling (e.g. metabolic flux analysis) to build novel tools for predicting microbiome-drug interactions. Towards this, large-scale datasets of bacteria-drug interactions generated in our and collaborator laboratories will provide an excellent starting point. The project will be carried out in close collaboration with experimental researchers in the group and thus additional data will be generated to feed in to multiple rounds of model improvement. We are looking for candidates with in-depth knowledge and hands-on experience in at least one of the following areas: machine learning, metabolic modelling, metabolomics data analysis. Willingness to work in an interdisciplinary team environment is a must.

Further project information can be found on the University of Cambridge Website

It is recommended that you contact the supervisor prior to making your formal application:

This advert will remain open until 28th June 2019 or until a suitable candidate is found.

 

PhD Studentship - The DNA Damage Response in Cancer

Cancer formation is the result of several alterations in the proteins that control the response to environmental stress, including DNA Damage Agents, as well as genes that control cell survival, cell proliferation or cell death. A crucial role here is exerted by p53, that, conversely, is mutated in over half of all human tumours. In the last decade two homologues of p53 have been identified: p63, involved in epithelial development, and p73, involved in toxicity, cancer and neurodegeneration. The project aims to understand the mechanisms of p53, mutated p53 and its family members regulation during normal conditions and upon insults and to define how these transcription factors influence gene expression, epigenetic landscape and the outcome and severity of cellular and organismal response to insults.

This project represents an ideal opportunity to learn a range of state-of-the-art techniques including, basic cell biology, molecular biology and bioinformatics tools to dissect the in vitro and in vivo mechanisms of cancer development.

Further project information can be found on the University of Cambridge website.

It is recommended that you contact the supervisor, Dr. Melino,  prior to making your formal application - gm614@mrc-tox.cam.ac.uk

This advert will remain open until 28th June 2019 or until a suitable candidate is found.

 

All applications should be submitted via the University's online applicant portal.